Legislation List

 

California Campaign Finance Legislation

The status of the California bills listed below can be found here.


 

California Sunshine Act - Senate Bill 2

  • Require clear disclosure as to who is paying for recommendations on often deceptive slate mailers. 
  • Require “Stand by Your Ad” disclosures, like those for federal campaign ads, for state campaign ads, as is required in federal elections
  • Increase fines for violations

 

Preventing Dark Money Contributions in  Future Campaigns - Senate Bill 27

In order to ensure that cases like this are not repeated, the LWVC strongly supports SB 27 (Correa), which will ensure that the original sources of all political donations are reported. SB 27:

  • Establishes conditions under which nonprofits and other organizations that make campaign contributions or expenditures are required to disclose the names of their donors
  • Requires the FPPC Web site to include a list of the largest contributors to committees that support or oppose state ballot measures or candidates
  • Will take effect July 1, 2014.

 

California DISCLOSE Act - Assembly Bill 700 (Gomez / Levine)

  • Require disclosure of the top 3 original funding sources of amounts greater than $50K for all political ads for ballot measures, in all media, clearly and prominently on the ads themselves.  www.cadisclose.org

 


 

Elections: Ballot Measure Contributions- SB 844

Existing law requires each campaign committee formed or existing primarily to support or oppose a statewide ballot measure to file with the Secretary of State periodic reports identifying the sources and amounts of contributions received during specified periods. Existing law, including the Political Reform Act of 1974, also specifies information required to be included in the state ballot pamphlet for each statewide ballot measure to be voted upon.

This bill would require the Secretary of State to create an Internet Web site, or use other available technology, to consolidate information about each ballot measure in a manner that is easy for voters to access and understand. The Internet Web site would be required to include a summary of each ballot measure, the total amount of reported contributions made to support or oppose a ballot measure, and a list of a committee’s top 10 contributors, as specified. The bill would require the state ballot pamphlet to include for each ballot measure a printed statement that refers voters to the Secretary of State’s Internet Web site for a list of committees primarily formed to support or oppose a ballot measure, and information on how to access the committee’s top 10 contributors.

This bill would incorporate additional changes in Section 9082.7 of the Elections Code proposed by SB 1253, that would become operative only if SB 1253 and this bill are both chaptered and become effective on or before January 1, 2015, and this bill is chaptered last. The bill would, contingent upon the enactment of SB 1442, incorporate additional changes.

The Political Reform Act of 1974, an initiative measure, generally provides that the Legislature may amend the act to further the act’s purposes upon a 2/3 vote of each house and compliance with specified procedural requirements. The act also provides that, notwithstanding this requirement, the Legislature may add to the ballot pamphlet information regarding candidates or other information.

This bill, which would permit or require additional information to be included in the ballot pamphlet, would therefore require a majority vote.

 


The Ballot Measure Transparency Act - Senate Bill 1253

The Ballot Measure Transparency Act (SB 1253) was introduced by Senate President pro Tem Darrell Steinberg (D-Sacramento). A broad coalition of sponsors includes the League of Women Voters of California, California Common Cause, California NAACP, Think Long Committee for California, California Church IMPACT, and California Forward.

 

What our proposal does

 

  • Gives voters more useful information about initiatives so they can make informed decisions. This law would enhance the Secretary of State’s website and use of online resources, giving voters one-stop access to information about individuals and groups behind each initiative and exposing the sources of funding. Voters also could request an email version of the voter guide, reducing the costs of printing and mailing the guides.
  • Creates clear and voter-friendly explanations of what each initiative would do or would not do, addressing widespread voter concern that initiative wording often is too confusing and complicated. It would make it clear whether a measure imposes or increases taxes or fees or repeals an existing law.
  • Identifies and corrects mistakes in an initiative before it appears on the ballot. Now, initiative backers have few options to correct or withdraw initiative language, even when legal flaws are identified. This law would give voters an opportunity to comment on initiatives before they are circulated for signature. By extending the time for gathering signatures, this law would require the Legislature to hold earlier public hearings to review initiatives. This law would also allow the authors of an initiative to withdraw it after petitions and signatures are certified, but before ballots are printed, simplifying the ballot

 

- See more at: http://www.commoncause.org/site/pp.asp?c=dkLNK1MQIwG&b=9022157#sthash.nSKZLD7A.dpuf

Create a  Ballot Measure instructing the Congress and the California legislature to amend the U.S. Constitution to overturn Citizens United decision - Senate Bill 1272

 

“Shall the Congress of the United States propose, and the California legislature ratify, an amendment or amendments to the United States Constitution to overturn Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission (2010) 558 U.S. 310, and other applicable judicial precedents, to allow the full regulation or limitation of campaign contributions and spending, to ensure that all citizens, regardless of wealth, may express their views to one another, and to make clear that the rights protected by the United States Constitution are the rights of natural persons only?”

 


 

 

California Legislative measure to call for a US Constitutional Convention under Article V - Assembly Joint Resolution 1

Historically, all amendments to the U.S. Constitution have started in Congress, and been ratified later by 3/4 of the states. AJR 1 takes advantage of the rarely-used Article V process for amending the federal Constitution, which allows states to demand that Congress act. If 2/3 of the states make such a demand, Congress must call a constitutional convention on the topic. Several states and municipalities have already passed informal resolutions condemning the Citizens United decision, but Gatto’s AJR 1 is the first to utilize the Article V process which could compel Congress to act.

The state-initiated process in Article V has been tried several times, with limited success. Although the process has never resulted in a constitutional convention, it has spurred Congress to take action several times. According to a 2007 article in the Harvard Journal of Law and Public Policy, at least four different amendments to the U.S. Constitution have been proposed by Congress in part because of Article V actions. For example, the amendments that repealed prohibition and allowed for the direct election of Senators were first demanded by state legislatures under Article V.


 

 

 

 

US Campaign Finance Legislation

 

 ·    The status of the U.S. bills listed below can be found here.

Summary: H.R.20 of 2015

Government By the People Act

Americans want—and deserve—a government that’s truly of, by, and for the people. One in which the men and women they elect to Congress are free to do what’s best for their constituents and their country, what founding father James Madison called a government “dependent on the people alone.”

Unfortunately, today, the voices of everyday Americans aren’t being heard because big money dominates the financing of campaigns. Big money campaign donors fill the bank accounts of candidates from both parties, fund super PACs, and hire lobbyists to bend policy in their direction.

We must break the dependence on big money so that Congress can focus on the people’s priorities. We must return our government to one that is of, by, and for the people, not of, by, and for the big money donors. Let’s start with the Government By the People Act. Here’s how it would work.

1. Empower Everyday Americans to Participate

Provide everyday Americans with a $25 refundable My Voice tax credit to help spur small-dollar contributions to candidates for Congressional office. With Americans newly empowered to participate in campaign giving, candidates will be able to re-engage with everyday voters, improving our representative democracy and reducing Congress’ dependence on big money interests.

2. Amplify the Voice of Everyday Americans

Establish a Freedom from Influence Fund to multiply the impact of small-dollar donations ($150 or less). Everyday Americans will have their small-dollar contributions matched if they give to a Congressional candidate who foregoes traditional PAC money and focuses on earning broad-based support from small-dollar donors. That turns a $50 contribution into a $350 contribution – matched at a rate of $6 to $1. For those candidates who agree to take only small-dollar donations, the $50 contribution can become a $500 contribution – matched at a rate of $9 to $1.

3. Fight Back Against Big Money Special Interests

Prevent super PACs and dark money interests from drowning out the voice of everyday Americans. In the wake of the Citizens United decision, unlimited outside spending has monopolized the airwaves in the final weeks of elections. Citizen-funded candidates who are able to raise at least $50,000 in additional small-dollar donations within the 60-day “home stretch” of the general election would be eligible for additional resources to help break this monopoly.

Video announcing the introduction of the Government By the People Act

 


 

 

Summary: H.R.148 — 113th Congress (2013-2014)

Introduced in House (01/03/2013)

Disclosure of Information on Spending on Campaigns Leads to Open and Secure Elections Act of 2013 or DISCLOSE 2013 Act - Amends the Federal Election Campaign Act of 1971 to redefine the term "independent expenditure" as an expenditure by a person that, when taken as a whole, expressly advocates the election or defeat of a clearly identified candidate, or is the functional equivalent of express advocacy because it can be interpreted by a reasonable person only as advocating the election or defeat of a candidate, taking into account whether the communication involved mentions a candidacy, a political party, or a challenger to a candidate, or takes a position on a candidates, qualifications, or fitness for office.

Expands the period during which certain communications are treated as electioneering communications.

Prescribes: (1) disclosure requirements for corporations, labor organizations, and certain other entities; and (2) disclaimer requirements for campaign-related disbursements and for certain communications.

Requires any communication transmitted through radio or television to include an individual or organizational disclosure statement, together with: (1) the Top Two Funders List of the persons providing the largest and second largest aggregate payments of $10,000 or more for a radio communication, and (2) the Top Five Funders List of the five persons providing the largest aggregate payments of $10,000 or more for a television communication.

Repeals the prohibition against political contributions by individuals age 17 or younger.

Requires a covered organization which submits regular, periodic reports to its shareholders, members, or donors on its finances or activities to include in each report, in a clear and conspicuous manner, the information included in the statements it has filed about campaign-related disbursements the organization has made during the period covered by the report.

Amends the Lobbying Disclosure Act of 1995 to require semiannual reports on certain election campaign contributions filed with the Secretary of the Senate or the Clerk of the House of Representatives by registered lobbyists (or persons or organizations required to register as lobbyists) to contain: (1) the amount of any independent expenditure of $1,000 or more made by each such person or organization, along with the name of each candidate being supported or opposed and the amount spent supporting or opposing that candidate; and (2) the amount of any electioneering communication of $1,000 or more made by such person or organization, along with the name of the candidate referred to in the communication and whether the communication involved was in support of or in opposition to the candidate.

 


 

 

Summary: H.R.269 — 113th Congress (2013-2014)

Introduced in House (01/15/2013)

Fair Elections Now Act - Amends the Federal Election Campaign Act of 1971 (FECA) with respect to:

  • candidate benefits of fair elections financing of House of Representatives election campaigns;
  • allocations to candidates from the Fair Elections Fund established by this Act;
  • 500% matching payments to candidates for certain small dollar contributions;
  • Fund allocation eligibility requirements;
  • certification of a federal election candidate as a participating candidate;
  • contribution, expenditure, and fundraising requirements;
  • a public debate requirement;
  • remission to the Fair Elections Fund of unspent funds after an election;
  • establishment of the Fair Elections Fund and of a Fair Elections Oversight Board;
  • civil penalties for violation of contribution and expenditure requirements; and
  • transfer of a portion of collected civil money penalties into the Fair Elections Fund.

Prohibits: (1) use of contributions by a participating candidate for any purposes other than an election campaign, and (2) establishment of joint fundraising committees with any political committee other than a candidate's authorized committee. Prescribes a limitation on coordinated expenditures by political party committees with participating candidates.

Amends FECA to empower the Federal Election Commission (FEC) to petition the U.S. Supreme Court for a writ of certiorari to appeal a civil action.

Requires all designations, statements, and reports required to be filed under FECA to be filed: (1) directly with the FEC, and (2) in electronic form accessible by computers. Reduces from 48 hours to 24 hours after their receipt the deadline for the FEC to make designations, statements, reports, or notifications available to the public in the FEC office and on the Internet.

 


 

 

Summary: H.R.268 — 113th Congress (2013-2014)


Introduced in House (01/15/2013)

Grassroots Democracy Act of 2013 - Amends the Internal Revenue Code to allow a refundable credit of up to $25 ($50 in the case of a joint return), adjusted for inflation, for qualified grassroots federal congressional campaign contributions paid by the taxpayer during the taxable year.

Directs the Grassroots Democracy Advisory Commission (GDAC, established by this Act) to establish a pilot program under which a qualified individual shall be provided with a "Grassroots Democracy Coupon" during the election cycle, which will be assigned a routing number and, at the individual's option, provided in either paper or electronic form. Authorizes the individual to: (1) submit the Coupon, using the routing number, in either electronic or paper form to qualified federal election candidates, and (2) allocate portions of the Coupon's value in $5 increments to a candidate (up to a maximum of $50 per candidate). Requires the GDAC to pay the candidate who transmits the Coupon to it the portion of the Coupon's value that the individual allocated to the candidate, which shall be considered a contribution under the Federal Election Campaign Act of 1971 (FECA).

Amends FECA with respect to: (1) benefits for participating congressional candidates; (2) Federal Election Commission (FEC) payments to such candidates; (3) candidate use of payments; (4) qualified grassroots contribution, expenditure, and fundraising requirements; (5) certification of participating congressional candidates; (6) campaign administration; (7) prevention of the unnecessary spending of public funds; (8) remittal to the Grassroots Democracy Fund of unspent funds after an election; (9) eligibility of participating candidates for payments; (10) establishment of the Grassroots Democracy Fund in the Treasury and of a Grassroots Democracy Advisory Commission in the FEC; and (11) civil penalties for violation of contribution and expenditure requirements.

Prohibits use of contributions by a participating candidate for any purposes other than an election campaign.

Revises bundler disclosure requirements to repeal a specified exception and so require disclosure of persons who provided bundled contributions to the reporting committee.

Extends from 60 days before a general, special, or runoff election to 120 days before such an election the period for treatment of communications as electioneering communications.

Creates user fees, payable to the FEC, for candidate-designated political committees and bundlers.

Amends FECA to empower the FEC to petition the U.S. Supreme Court for a writ of certiorari to appeal a civil action to enforce the Act.

Requires all political committee designations, statements, and reports required to be filed under FECA to be filed: (1) directly with the FEC, and (2) in electronic form accessible by computers. Reduces from 48 hours to 24 hours after their receipt the deadline for the FEC to make designations, statements, reports, or notifications available to the public in the FEC office and on the Internet.

Amends the Internal Revenue Code to repeal: (1) the alternative tax on political organizations that have net capital gains for the taxable year; and (2) the treatment as tax-exempt functions of proceeds from a political fundraising or entertainment event, from the sale of political campaign materials not received in the ordinary course of trade or business, or from any bingo game.

Revises the formula limiting the amount included in the gross income of a tax-exempt organization that expends funds for an exempt function of a political committee.

Repeals the application of graduated tax rates for principal campaign committees (thus applying the highest rates to such committees).

Allows an individual to designate a specified portion of any overpayment of tax as a contribution to the Grassroots Democracy Fund.

Amends the Communications Act of 1934 to set a station's lowest unit price for preemptible use as the charge for a broadcast by the national committee of a political party for an affiliated candidate.

Authorizes the FEC to revoke a broadcast station license or construction permit only for at least three willful failures to allow reasonable access to, or to permit purchase of reasonable amounts of time for the use of, a broadcasting station by a legally qualified candidate for federal office.

 


 

 

 

Summary: H.R.270 — 113th Congress (2013-2014)


Introduced in House (01/15/2013)

Empowering Citizens Act - Amends the Internal Revenue Code and the Federal Election Campaign Act of 1971 to revise the system of public financing for presidential primary and general elections occurring after January 1, 2014, and to establish a system of public financing for congressional elections.

Increases the amount of matching funds for presidential primaries from a one-to-one match to a five-to-one match for contributions of $250 or less from individuals. Limits the total amount of payments to a primary candidate to $100 million. Provides for an inflation adjustment to matching contributions beginning after 2013.

Requires presidential primary candidates who opt to participate in the public financing system to certify to the Federal Election Commission (FEC) that they have raised $25,000 (currently, $5,000) in each of 20 states, with individual contributions limited to $250. Requires such candidates to commit to accept public financing in both the primary and general elections.

Limits contributions to presidential primary candidates who participate in the public financing system to $1,250 from individual contributors (currently, $2,500). Prohibits primary candidates from accepting contributions or bundled contributions (i.e., combining small contributions into one large contribution) from lobbyists or political action committees (PACs).

Eliminates expenditure limitations for presidential primary and general elections.

Changes the period for payment of matching funds to presidential primary candidates from January 1 of the election year to six months prior to the date of the earliest state primary election.

Revises general election payment provisions to allow a grant of $50 million to candidates and an additional $150 million in matching funds based upon a five-to-one match of contributions raised after June 1 of the general election year from individual donors giving up to $250 each.

Increases to $50 million the limit on coordinated spending by a national party and its presidential candidate in a general election campaign.

Eliminates public financing for national party conventions. Allows individual contributions up to $25,000 in each four-year presidential election cycle to pay for national party convention costs. Prohibits the use of unregulated funds (soft money) to pay for national party convention costs.

Provides for public financing of congressional election campaigns. Establishes the Empowering Citizens Payment Account in the Presidential Election Campaign Fund to finance congressional election campaigns.

Increases from $3 to $20 ($6 to $40 for joint returns) the tax check-off for contributions to the Presidential Election Campaign Fund. Directs the Secretary of the Treasury to prescribe regulations to ensure that approved tax preparation software does not automatically accept or decline a check-off of contributions for the public financing system.

Directs the FEC to issue regulations on best efforts for identifying persons making contributions to political committees.

Prohibits an authorized committee of a candidate from establishing a joint fundraising committee with a political committee other than an authorized committee of a candidate.

Revises reporting requirements for the disclosure of bundled contributions by lobbyists and to presidential campaigns.

Sets forth rules for judicial review of campaign finance laws and FEC actions.

 


 

 

 

Summary: S.9 — 113th Congress (2013-2014)


Introduced in Senate (01/22/2013)

Clean and FairElectionsAct - Expresses the sense of the Senate with respect to congressional attention to elections and voting, including concerning:

  • structuring election administration and campaign finance systems so that the interests of the American public are the first priority;
  • greater transparency and an end to anonymous political spending by shadow groups and special interests;
  • disclosure of campaign contributions in a searchable, public online database,
  • safeguarding the right to vote, including by prohibiting deceptive and misleading efforts to prevent voters from exercising the franchise;
  • streamlining voting procedures;
  • passage of legislation that includes expanded absentee voting, mandatory early voting periods, and voter registration reforms;
  • ensuring that local election officials have working voting systems that are accessible, secure, and easy to use;
  • state plans to reduce lines at polling places and provide additional flexibility in the event of a natural disaster or other emergency; and
  • enforcement of the guarantees of the Fourteenth and Fifteenth Amendments to the Constitution and the Voting Rights Act of 1965 so that all Americans are able to vote and have their votes count without discrimination.

 

Summary: S.791 — 113th Congress (2013-2014)


Introduced in Senate (04/23/2013)

Follow the MoneyAct of 2013 - Amends the Federal Election Campaign Act of 1971 and the Internal Revenue Code to set forth requirements for the disclosure of independent federal election-related contributions and expenditures.

Defines "independent federal election-related activity expenditure" to mean any expenditure that: (1) a reasonable person would conclude is made solely or substantially to influence or attempt to influence the nomination or election of any individual to federal office; (2) is not made in concert or cooperation with, or at the suggestion of, a candidate, the candidate's authorized committee, or a political party committee; and (3) is a payment made to another person if the transferor knows or has reason to know that such payment will be used to fund an independent federal election-related activity expenditure. Defines "independent political actor" to mean any person that: (1) makes independent federal election-related activity expenditures of $10,000 or more during the election cycle, (2) receives contributions that are intended by the transferor and understood by the recipient to be substantially used for making independently federal election-related activity expenditures and that aggregate $10,000 or more during the election cycle, or (3) makes qualified solicitations to 500 or more people during the election cycle.

Amends the Federal Election Campaign Act of 1971 to: (1) require every person who is an independent political actor and every treasurer of an independent political actor to file a registration statement with the Federal Election Commission (FEC) not later than 10 days after such person becomes an indepen dent political actor; (2) increase from $200 to $1,000 the threshold level at which candidates have to disclose contributions on FEC reports; (3) require candidates for the U.S. Senate to file reports directly with the FEC rather than with the Secretary of the Senate; and (4) allow a candidate or an authorized committee of a candidate to file with the FEC a statement disavowing any public communication which is not made in cooperation, consultation, or concert with such candidate or authorized committee.

Requires the FEC, not later than January 1, 2015, to make available an instant disclosure system for use in reporting contributions under the Federal Election Campaign Act of 1971.

Amends the Internal Revenue Code to: (1) impose an excise tax on tax-exempt organizations that fail to report contributions or election-related activity expenditures, (2) revoke the tax-exempt status of organizations that fail to register or report election-related expenditures and contributions, (3) deny a business-related tax deduction for independent election-related activity expenditures, and (4) extend protections to whistle blowers reporting violations of campaign finance laws.

Requires the Secretary of the Treasury and the FEC, not later than September 30, 2014, to prescribe joint regulations with respect to the definitions of "independent federal election-related activity expenditure" and "covered contribution" and the forms and regulations necessary to carry out the registration and reports required by the Federal Election Campaign Act of 1971.

Amends the federal criminal code to impose a criminal penalty on, and terminate the employment of, any federal employee or officer who discriminates against any person on the basis of information reported under the Federal Election Campaign Act of 1971.

 


 

 

 

S.2023

 

S.1538  This bill is the 114th Congress version of  S.2023, which was introduced by Senator Durbin in the 113th Congress.


Latest Title: Fair Elections Now Act
Sponsor: Sen Durbin, Richard [IL] (introduced 6/10/2015)    

SUMMARY:  (unofficial)
  • To encourage participation, people could qualify for a $25 refundable My Voice tax credit for their small donations
  • After proving their viability by collecting a large number of small contributions from their home state, candidates receive a base grant to help fund their campaigns.
  • After qualifying, the candidate must limit their contributions to $150 or less. Those donations would be matched, up to a limit, on a six to one basis.
 

 

 

Congressional Resolutions for Constitutional Ammendments

 

MCGOVERN RESOLUTION

HOUSE JOINT RESOLUTION 20

113th CONGRESS 1st Session IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES January 22, 2013

Mr. MCGOVERN (for himself, Ms. PINGREE of Maine, Mr. CAPUANO, Mr. COHEN, Mr. CICILLINE, Mr. HOLT, Mr. MICHAUD, Mr. DEFAZIO, Mr. LANGEVIN, and Ms. SHEA-PORTER) introduced the following joint resolution; which was referred to the Committee on the Judiciary

Resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled (two-thirds of each House concurring therein), That the following article is proposed as an amendment to the Constitution of the United States, which shall be valid to all intents and purposes as part of the Constitution when ratified by the legislatures of three-fourths of the several States:

JOINT RESOLUTION Proposing an amendment to the Constitution of the United States relating to contributions and expenditures with respect to elections.

ARTICLE

Section 1: To advance the fundamental principle of political equality for all, Congress shall have power to regulate the raising and spending of money and in-kind equivalents with respect to Federal elections, including through setting limits on: (1) the amount of contributions to candidates for nomination for election to, or for election to, Federal office; and (2) the amount of expenditures that may be made by, in support of, or in opposition to such candidates.

Section 2: To advance the fundamental principle of political equality for all, a State shall have power to regulate the raising and spending of money and in-kind equivalents with respect to State elections, including through setting limits on: (1) the amount of contributions to candidates for nomination for election to, or for election to, State office; and (2) the amount of expenditures that may be made by, in support of, or in opposition to such candidates.

Section 3: Congress shall have power to implement and enforce this article by appropriate legislation.

 

 


 

 

MCGOVERN RESOLUTION (2nd)

HOUSE JOINT RESOLUTION 21

113th CONGRESS 1st Session IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES January 22, 2013

Mr. MCGOVERN (for himself, Mr. JONES, Ms. PINGREE of Maine, Mr. CAPUANO, Mr. COHEN, Mr. CICILLINE, Mr. FARR, Mr. DEFAZIO, and Ms. LEE of California) introduced the following joint resolution; which was referred to the Committee on the Judiciary.

Proposing an amendment to the Constitution of the United States to clarify the authority of Congress and the States to regulate corporations, limited liability companies or other corporate entities established by the laws of any State, the United States, or any foreign state.

Resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled (two-thirds of each House concurring therein), That the following article is proposed as an amendment to the Constitution of the United States, which shall be valid to all intents and purposes as part of the Constitution when ratified by the legislatures of three-fourths of the several States:

ARTICLE

Section 1: We the people who ordain and establish this Constitution intend the rights protected by this Constitution to be the rights of natural persons.

Section 2: The words people, person, or citizen as used in this Constitution do not include corporations, limited liability companies or other corporate entities established by the laws of any State, the United States, or any foreign state, and such corporate entities are subject to such regulation as the people, through their elected State and Federal representatives, deem reasonable and are otherwise consistent with the powers of Congress and the States under this Constitution.

Section 3: Nothing contained herein shall be construed to limit the people's rights of freedom of speech, freedom of the press, free exercise of religion, freedom of association and all such other rights of the people, which rights are unalienable.'

 

 


 

 

EDWARDS RESOLUTION

HOUSE JOINT RESOLUTION 25

113th CONGRESS 1st Session IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES February 6, 2013

Ms. EDWARDS (for herself, Mr. CONYERS, Mr. BLUMENAUER, Mr. CAPUANO, Mr. CICILLINE, Ms. ESTY, Mr. GRAYSON, Mr. GRIJALVA, Mr. HIMES, Mr. HUFFMAN, Ms. EDDIE BERNICE JOHNSON of Texas, Mr. JOHNSON of Georgia, Ms. LEE of California, Mr. MCDERMOTT, Mr. MCGOVERN, Mr. MEEKS, Ms. NORTON, Ms. PINGREE of Maine, Mr. RUSH, Mr. SARBANES, Ms. SLAUGHTER, Mr. VAN HOLLEN, Mr. WAXMAN, Mr. COHEN, Mr. MARKEY, Ms. SHEA-PORTER, Ms. HAHN, Ms. BASS, Mr. WELCH, and Mrs. DAVIS of California) introduced the following joint resolution; which was referred to the Committee on the Judiciary.

Resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled (two-thirds of each House concurring therein), That the following article is proposed as an amendment to the Constitution of the United States, which shall be valid to all intents and purposes as part of the Constitution when ratified by the legislatures of three-fourths of the several States:

ARTICLE

SECTION 1: Nothing in this Constitution shall prohibit Congress and the States from imposing content-neutral regulations and restrictions on the expenditure of funds for political activity by any corporation, limited liability company, or other corporate entity, including but not limited to contributions in support of, or in opposition to, a candidate for public office.

Section 2: Nothing contained in this Article shall be construed to abridge the freedom of the press.

 

 


 

 

NOLAN RESOLUTION

HOUSE JOINT RESOLUTION 29

113th CONGRESS 1st Session IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES February 14, 2013

Mr. NOLAN (for himself and Mr. POCAN) introduced the following joint resolution; which was referred to the Committee on the Judiciary

Resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled (two-thirds of each House concurring therein), That the following article is proposed as an amendment to the Constitution of the United States, which shall be valid to all intents and purposes as part of the Constitution when ratified by the legislatures of three-fourths of the several States within seven years after the date of its submission for ratification:

ARTICLE

Section 1: The rights protected by the Constitution of the United States are the rights of natural persons only. Artificial entities, such as corporations, limited liability companies, and other entities, established by the laws of any State, the United States, or any foreign state shall have no rights under this Constitution and are subject to regulation by the People, through Federal, State, or local law. The privileges of artificial entities shall be determined by the People, through Federal, State, or local law, and shall not be construed to be inherent or inalienable.

Section 2: Federal, State and local government shall regulate, limit, or prohibit contributions and expenditures, including a candidate's own contributions and expenditures, for the purpose of influencing in any way the election of any candidate for public office or any ballot measure. Federal, State and local government shall require that any permissible contributions and expenditures be publicly disclosed. The judiciary shall not construe the spending of money to influence elections to be speech under the First Amendment.

Section 3: Nothing contained in this amendment shall be construed to abridge the freedom of the press.

 

 


 

MCNERNEY RESOLUTION

HOUSE JOINT RESOLUTION 31

 

2/11/2015--Introduced.

 

Constitutional Amendment

 

This bill specifies individual citizens or public election financing or voter education systems as the only sources of funding to directly or indirectly support or oppose campaigns for election to public office or state ballot measures.

 

The Congress, the states, and local jurisdictions are required to establish limits on the amount of contributions individuals may make with respect to a single campaign for election to public office.

 

States and local jurisdictions are required to establish limits on the amount of contributions individuals may make with respect to a ballot measure.

 

The total of combined contributions to the principal campaign committee of a candidate from citizens who are not eligible to vote for the candidate is limited to the total of combined contributions from citizens who are eligible to vote for the candidate.

 

 

 


 

 

DEUTCH RESOLUTION

HOUSE JOINT RESOLUTION 34

113th CONGRESS 1st Session IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES March 12, 2013

Mr. DEUTCH (for himself, Ms. CHU, Mr. HASTINGS of Florida, Mr. CICILLINE, Mr. DEFAZIO, Mr. ELLISON, Mr. GEORGE MILLER of California, Mr. MORAN, Ms. NORTON, Mr. PERLMUTTER, Ms. PINGREE of Maine, Mr. RANGEL, Ms. SCHAKOWSKY, Mr. SCHRADER, Mr. WAXMAN, Mr. WELCH, Ms. DELAURO, Mr. SARBANES, Mr. BLUMENAUER, Mr. KEATING, Ms. SLAUGHTER, Mr. ENGEL, Ms. FRANKEL of Florida, Mr. LARSON of Connecticut, Mr. CONYERS, Mr. LEWIS, Mr. GUTIERREZ, Mr. PASCRELL, Mr. GRAYSON, Mr. LOWENTHAL, Mr. RYAN of Ohio, Mr. CARTWRIGHT, and Ms. JACKSON LEE) introduced the following joint resolution; which was referred to the Committee on the Judiciary

JOINT RESOLUTION: Proposing an amendment to the Constitution of the United States to restore the rights of the American people that were taken away by the Supreme Court's decision in the Citizens United case and related decisions, to protect the integrity of our elections, and to limit the corrosive influence of money in our democratic process.

Resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled (two-thirds of each House concurring therein), That the following article is proposed as an amendment to the Constitution of the United States, which shall be valid to all intents and purposes as part of the Constitution when ratified by the legislatures of three-fourths of the several States:

ARTICLE

Section 1: Whereas the right to vote in public elections belongs only to natural persons as citizens of the United States, so shall the ability to make contributions and expenditures to influence the outcome of public elections belong only to natural persons in accordance with this Article.

Section 2: Nothing in this Constitution shall be construed to restrict the power of Congress and the States to protect the integrity and fairness of the electoral process, limit the corrupting influence of private wealth in public elections, and guarantee the dependence of elected officials on the people alone by taking actions which may include the establishment of systems of public financing for elections, the imposition of requirements to ensure the disclosure of contributions and expenditures made to influence the outcome of a public election by candidates, individuals, and associations of individuals, and the imposition of content neutral limitations on all such contributions and expenditures.

Section 3: Nothing in this Article shall be construed to alter the freedom of the press.

Section 4: Congress and the States shall have the power to enforce this Article through appropriate legislation.

 


 

 

YARMUTH RESOLUTION

H.J.RES.107


Latest Title: Proposing an amendment to the Constitution of the United States relating to contributions and expenditures with respect to Federal elections.
Sponsor: Rep Yarmuth, John A. [KY-3] (introduced 1/16/2014) Cosponsors (3)
Latest Major Action: 1/16/2014 Referred to House committee. Status: Referred to the House Committee on the Judiciary.

SUMMARY AS OF:
1/16/2014--Introduced.

Constitutional Amendment - Denies as protected speech any financial expenditures, or in kind equivalents, with respect to a candidate for federal office, without regard to whether or not a communication expressly advocates the election or defeat of a specified candidate in the election.

 

Gives Congress the power to enact a mandatory public financing system to provide funds to qualified candidates in federal elections, which shall be the sole source of funds raised or spent with respect to federal elections.

MAJOR ACTIONS:

***NONE***

ALL ACTIONS:

1/16/2014:
Referred to the House Committee on the Judiciary.

Rep Cohen, Steve [TN-9] - 1/16/2014
Rep Lee, Barbara [CA-13] - 1/16/2014
Rep Sarbanes, John P. [MD-3] - 1/16/2014

 

 

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Legislation

The legislation below was all introduced during the 2013 - 2014 or 2015 - 2016 California legislative session or the 113th or 114th Congress.  All those that were not enacted during their respective sessions have expired. 

California Legislation

  • SB 2 - California The Sunshine Act - Died in Assembly committee
  • SB 27 - Preventing Dark Money Contributions in  Future Campaigns - SIGNED INTO LAW
  • AB 700 - The California Disclose Act 
  • SB 254 - Create a ballot measure whereby the people of California can instruct its USs enators and congressional representatives to pass vote for an amendment stating that money is NOT speech and corporations are NOT persons
  • AB 990 - Bill to require increased disclosure and readability on political mailers - PASSED
  • SB 844 - Elections: Ballot Measure Contributions - SIGNED INTO LAW
  • SB 1253: The Ballot Measure Transparency Act- SIGNED INTO LAW
  • SB 1272: Create a ballot measure calling for amendment to the US Constitution overturning Citizen United PASSED, then the resulting Propositon 49 ORDERED REMOVED from the 2014 ballot by the California Supreme Court.
  • SB 254:  Identical to SB 1272.  Introduced into the Senate in March 2016 after the CA Supreme Court killed SB 1272.

U.S. Legislation

  • AJR 1 - Call for US Constitutional Convention under Article V - PASSED!
  • H.R. 20 - The Government By the People Act
  • H.R. 430 - The US DISCLOSE Act of 2015
  • S.229 - The DISCLOSE Act of 2015
  • S. 1538 - The Fair Elections Now Act of 2015
  • H.R 424 - The Empowering Citizens Act of 2015
  • HJR 48 - Proposing an amendment to the Constitution of the United States providing that the rights extended by the Constitution are the rights of natural persons only.
  • HJR 31 - Proposing an amendment to the constitution of the United States that would limit campaign contributions to individuals or public funds and limit the amounts of contributions

Petitions